Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Fusion Fridays at Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena May 17

Pacific Asia Museum Announces 2013 Season of Fusion Fridays

Pacific Asia Museum announces its fourth season of Fusion Fridays, its summer evening series that mixes art in the galleries, live performances, interactive experiences and food and drinks in the courtyard, all within the museum's iconic building.

This year's Fusion Fridays will be May 17, June 21, July 19 and August 16 from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. and are free to members and $15 for nonmembers. Cocktail or Asian attire is encouraged for this indoor and outdoor event. The evenings also include guest DJs spinning in the courtyard, a cash bar, prizes, and L.A.'s best food trucks in the parking lot, with special performances and activities each individual evening as listed below.

This season, Pacific Asia Museum is proud to partner with Angel City Brewery. Angel City Brewery is located in the downtown Arts District of Los Angeles, and has been praised by the Los Angeles Times, LA Weekly, KCET and other local media. Representatives from Angel City Brewery will be at each event to pour their beers for guests.

Pacific Asia Museum has a rich history of bringing people and cultures together in a setting that promotes conversation and cross-cultural understanding. Fusion Fridays takes that mission to a new level, mixing the arts with other media to attract new audiences and increase the museum's visibility throughout the city. Keeping in mind that many people are hindered by traditional museum hours and event formats, Fusion Fridays aims to break down those barriers by keeping the museum doors open until late in the evening, bringing in diverse forms of entertainment and building community partnerships.

Fusion Fridays are sponsored in part by Wells Fargo and Toyota Financial Services. Special thanks to our partner Yelp!

May 17  The 2013 premiere will feature a beautiful Indonesian shadow puppet performance plus peeks behind the scenes, live gamelan music, and DJ Arshia Haq's special Bollywood dance mix!

June 21  Experience the dramatic Maori haka warrior dance, catch the summer spirit with traditional Japanese festival dances, and get arty with an activity inspired by special exhibition Takashi Tomo-oka!

July 19
Enjoy elegant Thai dancers and a dynamic Korean drumming performance, then shake it up on the dance floor to K-Pop tracks.  Plus, make your own Thai headdress, and get inspired in the galleries!

August 16  Celebrate the finale of another fabulous season of Fusion Fridays! DJ Jeremy Loudenback will be spinning everyone's favorite bhangra dance mix, so we'll have instructors to teach you the latest moves. Add in Chinese Lion dancers and some special surprises, and it's a night you won't want to miss!
  
About Pacific Asia Museum
Pacific Asia Museum is among the few institutions in the United States dedicated exclusively to the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands. The museum's mission is to further intercultural understanding through the arts of Asia and the Pacific Islands. Since 1971, Pacific Asia Museum has served a broad audience of students, families, adults, and scholars through its exhibitions and programs.

Pacific Asia Museum is located at 46 North Los Robles Avenue, Pasadena, California 91101. The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $10 general, $7 students/seniors, and free for museum members and children under 12. Admission is free every 4th Friday of the month. For more information visitwww.pacificasiamuseum.org or call (626) 449-2742.

1 comment:

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